Posts tagged Health
Effect of SHG Health Interventions on Reproductive, Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health

In a two-armed quasi-experimental study in Bihar, India, Saggurti et al. (2018) sampled 1,182 groups (810 SHG groups and 372 control groups) to determine whether an eight-session behavior-change health intervention effected healthy maternal and newborn practices (MNCH). They found that structured participatory communication on MNCH with women’s groups improved positive health practices.

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Care-Seeking Behaviors for Maternal and Newborn lllnesses Among Self Help Group Households

In twenty-five villages in Uttar Pradesh, India, Aruldas et al. (2017) qualitatively explored the connection between SHG membership and care-seeking for maternal and newborn illnesses. Though cultural practices hindered prompt care seeking for both SHG households and non-SHG households, there was some evidence that SHG households were seeking care sooner.

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The Effect of Combining a Health Program with Self Help Groups on Health Behaviors and Outcomes

In a matched comparison study in Gujarat and Karnataka, Saha, Kermode and Annear (2015) looked at the effect on maternal and child health of combining a health program with an SHG program. They found that women in SHGs were more likely to deliver their babies in an institution, to feed colostrum to their newborns and to have a toilet at home. There was however no statistically significant reduction in diarrhea among children in the intervention community nor was there a reduction in spending on treatments. 

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Community Development and Livestock Promotion in Rural Nepal: Effects on Child Growth and Health

In a two-year RCT, Miller et al. (2014) evaluated the effects of Heifer Nepal’s SHGs on child health and nutrition in six communities. They found that Heifer’s programming resulted in greater incremental improvement on height-for-age (HAZ) and weight-for-age (WAZ) z-scores for children under five years of age in the intervention group.

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The Effect of Self Help Groups on Access to Maternal Health Services

Using national data collected from 22,825 villages across India, Saha, Annear and Pathak (2013) determined that the presence of an SHG in a village is associated with higher knowledge of family planning and maternal health service uptake. Villages with an SHG were more likely to know of and utilize family planning products and services, 19% more likely to deliver in an institution and 8% more likely to have fed their newborns colostrum.

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How Do Women’s Groups Practicing Participatory Learning and Action Contribute to Birth Outcomes?

A Lancet study by Prost et al. (2013) undertook a systematic review of Randomized Control Trials in multiple countries to assess the impact of women’s groups on maternal and child mortality. The study found that participation in women’s groups was associated with a 37% reduction in maternal mortality, a 23% reduction in neonatal mortality, and a 9% reduction in still births.

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The Effect of Women’s Groups on Health Behaviors and Rates of Maternal and Child Mortality

A Lancet study in 2013 used a factorial, cluster-randomised controlled trial to determine the effect of women’s groups and peer counselling on health outcomes and behaviors in rural Malawi. Lewycka et al. (2013) found both interventions impressive, reducing maternal mortality, perinatal mortality, neonatal mortality, infant mortality and increasing exclusive breastfeeding. The study also found both approaches to be cost-effective.

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