Posts tagged India
Social Networks, Mobility and Political Participation

Using cross-sectional data from 2015, Kumar et al. (2019) looked into the potential for women’s SHGs to improve access to and use of public entitlement schemes in India. They found that while SHGs do not increase awareness of these schemes, SHG members are significantly more likely to make use of them. SHG members were also found to be more politically active than non-members.

Read the study

Read More
Unheard Voices: The Challenge of Inducing Women's Civic Speech

In 2005, the Government of Tamil Nadu launched its Pudhu Vaazhvu Project (PVP) in 2,300 village panchayats throughout the state. PVP used SHGs to reduce economic vulnerability and increase women’s agency and empowerment. In this study, Parthasarathy et al. (2017) used text-as-data methods to determine whether PVP induced women’s participation within village assemblies (gram sabha) and concluded that the project did in fact increase women’s attendance, propensity to speak and length of floor time.

Read the study

Read More
Care-Seeking Behaviors for Maternal and Newborn lllnesses Among Self Help Group Households

In twenty-five villages in Uttar Pradesh, India, Aruldas et al. (2017) qualitatively explored the connection between SHG membership and care-seeking for maternal and newborn illnesses. Though cultural practices hindered prompt care seeking for both SHG households and non-SHG households, there was some evidence that SHG households were seeking care sooner.

Read the study

Read More
Economic Self Help Group Programs for Improving Women’s Empowerment

Brody et al. (2015) explored the impact of SHGs on individual-level empowerment for women in low-and middle-income countries (Bangladesh, India, Thailand, Ethiopia, South Africa and Haiti), using evidence from 23 rigorous quantitative impact evaluations. They also delved into 11 qualitative evaluations on women’s opinions on participation and benefits of SHG membership. Their analysis pointed to positive effects on economic, political and social empowerment. 

Read the study

Read More
The Effect of Combining a Health Program with Self Help Groups on Health Behaviors and Outcomes

In a matched comparison study in Gujarat and Karnataka, Saha, Kermode and Annear (2015) looked at the effect on maternal and child health of combining a health program with an SHG program. They found that women in SHGs were more likely to deliver their babies in an institution, to feed colostrum to their newborns and to have a toilet at home. There was however no statistically significant reduction in diarrhea among children in the intervention community nor was there a reduction in spending on treatments. 

Read the study

Read More
Recasting Culture to Undo Gender: A Sociological Analysis of Jeevika in Rural Bihar, India

Sanyal et al. (2015) qualitatively evaluated four villages participating in the JEEViKA program in Bihar, India to answer the question: how do large-scale development interventions induce cultural change? A key component of JEEViKA is the formation of SHGs and it was found that this intervention successfully challenged gender norms in a relatively short period of time.

Read the study

Read More
Public Good Provision in Indian Rural Areas Through Collective Action by Microfinance Groups

Casini et al. (2015) examined the social behavior of PRADAN’s SHGs and how it influenced the governance of rural Indian communities. As women join SHGs they tend to participate more frequently in collective actions, usually after about three years of weekly meetings. In Mayurbhanj and Keonjhar districts in Odisha, these collective actions did have a significant impact on local government officials and the issues they focused on.

Read the study

Read More