Final Evaluation of the SHG/Food Security Programme, Horn of Africa

Tear Netherlands and Tearfund UK partnered to implement a food security program in the Horn of Africa (Kenya, Ethiopia, Somaliland), with SHGs playing a central role. The final evaluation of the program evaluated the impact of the initiative on the food security and resilience of the most marginalized in the area. The evaluation team found that SHG members, especially longer standing ones, were better able than non-members to withstand shocks such as drought and were better placed for recovery.

Read the study

Read More
Humanitarian Cash Transfers Through Self Help Groups

The University of Reading evaluated modalities for delivering emergency assistance to SHGs during the 2015 drought in Ethiopia. The study involved 230 groups receiving 30 USD per SHG member. The study found that SHGs with transfers saved and invested more; there was no damage to the capital accumulation from before the cash transfer; and social structures were unaffected.  

Read the study

Read More
Care-Seeking Behaviors for Maternal and Newborn lllnesses Among SHG Households

In twenty-five villages in Uttar Pradesh, India, Aruldas et al. (2017) qualitatively explored the connection between SHG membership and care-seeking for maternal and newborn illnesses. Though cultural practices hindered prompt care seeking for both SHG households and non-SHG households, there was some evidence that SHG households were seeking care sooner.

Read the study

Read More
An Overview of SHGs and their Contributions to Improved Food Security

Entz et al. (2016) reviewed both academic and grey literature to determine that Self Help Groups/Savings Groups had a net positive impact on food security. Out of 18 reports reviewed, 17 showed some improvement in household food consumption, reduction in lean months, increase in meals per day, increased diversity in diet, reduction in “suffering” due to food insecurity or increases in food security indices.

Read the study

Read More
Self Help Groups and Drought Resilience: Lessons from Ethiopia

The Tufts Feinstein International Center evaluated the role of Self Help Groups in building drought resilience in the 2015/2016 drought in Ethiopia. The study found that mature Self Help Groups were better able to protect their livestock, better able to reduce their group savings without reducing payments, and better able to maintain their household food supply.

Read the study

Read More
Evaluation Report: Tearfund Ireland Self Help Development in Ethiopia

This end of project evaluation assessed Tearfund Ireland’s SHG project in Ethiopia against OECD-DAC evaluation criteria. The project ranked highly on all five criteria: it holistically empowered the poorest members of the community; improved nutrition, health, education, household income and assets; and avoided high interest rates. SHGs were highly efficient, with major changes occurring at a low cost.

Read the study

Read More
Economic Self Help Group Programs for Improving Women’s Empowerment

Brody et al. (2015) explored the impact of SHGs on individual-level empowerment for women in low-and middle-income countries (Bangladesh, India, Thailand, Ethiopia, South Africa and Haiti), using evidence from 23 rigorous quantitative impact evaluations. They also delved into 11 qualitative evaluations on women’s opinions on participation and benefits of SHG membership. Their analysis pointed to positive effects on economic, political and social empowerment. 

Read the study

Read More